Review: Crossover 404k 40 inch 4k Monitor

404k Promo Photo
404k Promo Photo

Over the course of my computing life I’ve had a multitude of screen setups, from 17 and 21 inch CRT’s to my first LCD (ViewSonic, great monitor!) and on up through double, triple and quad display setups. Most recently I had been using a pair of Acer B233HU’s, one for my home desktop and one for my work laptop with Synergy for sharing one keyboard/mouse.  I chose these 23 inch units for their “higher than 1080p” resolution (2048 x 1152) and range of adjustments (up/down was the seller) way back in 2009.   Now that much higher resolution displays are becoming the norm this setup seemed a little long in the tooth and it was a great time to upgrade.

Define the need: how much space do I need?

The biggest issue I kept running into while looking to replace the Acer’s was that every monitor I looked at and compared resulted in a price times at least two computation.  I was weary of having 3-4 monitors spanning across my desk, especially now that my work life revolved around meetings email and IM. Having two monitors for work was a plus mainly to keep email up on one, but I no longer needed visual studio and 5 web browsers up to shuffle through.  Similarly on the home side I mostly browsed the web, used streaming services and played a few games (LoL, Sim City, Starcraft 2)- I had no need for more than one monitor.  Ideally  I’d be able to have a web browser up on my home machine and email up on my work machine with a flex spot for IM/other tasks so basically 3-4 views/monitors.

4k, pixel density and productivity

Throughout my search I had been against a 27-28 inch 4k monitor, sighting what I called “Pixel Overload”.  Having 4k resolution at 28 inches is beautiful, but I can’t leave scaling at 100% in windows and tile in 4 1080p browser screens and have them be readable. For those reasons, I thought 4k was out of the question and I was back to 4 higher than 1080p lower than 4k screens, likely opting to keep the acers for home and grab a new set for work.

Then I read the tale of people using 40 inch 4k screens at 30hz to program

They raved about what I was looking for: Desktop real estate, tons of it! Four usable 1080p screens in one! I started researching 40 inch 60hz screens and came across the 44k and finally the updated 404k version.  This seemed to be what I was looking for and had a feature that I never even considered: Split screen.

With Split screen I could split the monitor in half, or 4ths and have 1/2/3/4 “Monitors” according to windows. This meant no need for multiple screens!

The multi-view options on the 404k
The multi-view options on the 404k

I quickly justified the $700 price tag, ordered and waited anxiously for the box to arrive, and quickly set it up to launch the required game of LoL at 4k (OMG!):

The 404k running LoL @ 4k, Acer for side-by-side comparison

After some fiddling I ended up with the monitor setup in the “A |  B/C” configuration shown above for office hours. My windows 10  home machine is on the left occupying a 1920×2160 screen (display port) and my work laptop is powering two “monitors” on the right, each 1920×1080 (HDMI/DVI):

Windows 10 on the left, two windows 7 screens on the right

At night I press a few buttons and windows 10 takes over the whole thing, for a 4k home screen that is usable at 100% scaling.

Pros:

  • No scaling required, I get 4 20 inch 1080p monitors in front of my face without having multiple screens on the desk.
  • 4k gaming/movie watching from the home machine
  • Easy management of multi-screen setup and painless switching from 1/2 4k to full 4k in Win10
  • DisplayPort 1.2 and HDMI 2.0 for 4k @ 60hz goodness

Cons:

  • DVI/HDMI/DP/VGA inputs: would rather see 4 DP’s or 2 DP’s and 2 DVI’s
  • Monitor reported itself as a TV via HDMI so color was slightly off vs DVI until I used a DVI to HDMI cable and two DVI outs on the laptop, now the two screens are identical colors
  • No adjustments from cheap stand (I’ll be hanging mine on the wall, too low to the desk to use forever this way)
  • When setup for 3 screens you can’t have one screen be “Extra wide” and then two screens side by side, you’re stuck with an “Extra Tall” screen. This isn’t as annoying as I thought it would be but it could be more flexible.
  • Mine didn’t come with a remote, though most out there now do.

Overall: I am thrilled with the purchase and won’t go back to multiple monitors until I’ve got two of these things flanking me!

8 thoughts on “Review: Crossover 404k 40 inch 4k Monitor

  1. Pingback: My office is now in the office! | Chris Uthe

    1. Chris Post author

      I have no problems whatsoever with the color accuracy thus far, but I do not have a calibration tool either, so I’m going off what I am used to on other monitors. I do notice some slight vignetting on the extreme edges, I think partially due to viewing angle of being so close and partially due to the backlight setup. I’m writing a follow up review after using it a while so I’ll touch on that more there as well.

    2. chrisuthe

      I have no problems whatsoever with the color accuracy thus far, but I do not have a calibration tool either, so I’m going off what I am used to on other monitors. I do notice some slight vignetting on the extreme edges, I think partially due to viewing angle of being so close and partially due to the backlight setup. I’m writing a follow up review after using it a while so I’ll touch on that more there as well.

      1. Michael Watson

        I got one a week ago, and I am loving it! I have the perfect pixel version and is not experiencing any issues yet. The two things I don’t like are the speakers (I got some external ones) and the stand.

        1. Chris Post author

          I did not opt for the pixel perfect one but mine is (near as I can tell) pixel perfect anyway. I do not use the speakers (windows DID NOT like using them via display port) or the stand either, as I agree those are both very weak. One thing I’ve noticed is that the screen doesn’t like to wake up via Display Port all the time. Sometimes I have to unplug/replug power to the display.

    1. chrisuthe

      Plenty big, very sharp think of it this way: Look at a 1080p 20 inch screen, is the text readable? That’s basically how it will look on this monitor.

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